Swansea

The port at Swansea is a major commercial port. Its cargo traffic is not nearly as much as its neighbouring port at Port Talbot, but Swansea is very important for the Welsh community. In 2010 Swansea handled 604,000 tonnes of cargo traffic. Trade imports and exports through the port of Swansea rely heavily on the ports based in Northern and Western Europe. Also links with the Mediterranean and Ireland have proved to be significant.

For inland transportation of freight the A483 arterial road is the main route out of Swansea. Transporting on this road will take you in either direction straight to the M4 motorway. Swansea is located close to the West end of the M4, and once reaching this point, there are an array of A roads to take cargo into many parts of Wales. Leaving the M4 and joining the A48 arterial road will carry cargo into Carmarthen (27 miles), the A478 will take cargo back around the coast to the picturesque village of Tenby (52 miles). Slightly further afield on the A40 is Haverfordwest (56 miles), and taking the A477 takes you into Pembroke itself (59 miles).

Travelling along the M4 motorway towards England from Swansea, will take cargo to the capital, Cardiff (41 miles), then Newport (51 miles). Progressing along the M4 would take you over the Bristol Channel and into England where the first major destination is the city of Bristol (80 miles). Alternatively from Newport containers in transit can take the A449, join the A40 and head to Ross-on-Wye (84 miles). Taking this route, cargo can take the short journey along the M50 to join the M5 in Gloucestershire, enabling it to be further north within England, and closer to Birmingham (143 miles).

Throughout history Swansea has always been a major port in whatever it has dealt in, but it has also paid the price for its popularity. In the 19th century Swansea was one of the key centres of the world copper industry, and although the city has a very long and colourful history, the majority of the city is new. Again this is mainly due to the importance of the harbour. The industrial importance of the harbour and Swansea city, made it a target for bombing during WWII, and this led to big areas of the city being flattened. Now rebuilt, with a high standard of harbour for commercial facilities, the port of Swansea should continue to thrive and offer excellent import and export facilities for a diverse range of cargo.